Day: September 14, 2016

Andy Warhol and Soup

By Franklin Hill Perrell

Andy Warhol’s most acclaimed and iconic image is the Campbell Soup can, an image which has become virtually synonymous with his artistic identity. First hand drawn, and later captured in silhouette through silkscreen stencils, he has revisited it throughout his career. The earliest versions date from 1962 and they defined the style of the Pop Art movement: flat, frontal, boldly colored, and iconic in their familiarity from everyday life. According to Robert Indiana, Warhol painted Campbell soup because he liked the product. The same held true with his subjects like Coca Cola and money. Read More

Rachel Lee Hovnanian: Breakfast Cereal with a Message

Feast for the Eyes: Art Inspired by Food and Dining
Nassau County Museum of Art
Through November 6, 2016

By Debbie Wells, Artful Circle

dsc_0020Contemporary artist Rachel Lee Hovnanian explores modern America’s obsession with sweet breakfast food in a box. Seemingly wholesome and convenient, sugar cereals have been an important staple in every household for decades. This mixed media installation demonstrates their seductive qualities with colorful and cheerful packaging oozing a glittery white substance throughout, but with a deeper message. Read More

Richard Gachot: Sculpting Whimsy from Found Objects

Feast for the Eyes: Art Inspired by Food and Dining
Nassau County Museum of Art
Through November 6, 2016

By Debbie Wells, Artful Circle

In making his first pieces, Richard Gachot worked like a traditional sculptor in the Middle Ages: carving wood with hammer and chisel. The next stage of Gachot’s stylistic evolution began with the inclusion of a few ready-made elements, such as metal, wire, rope, or thread. As he progressed, he increasingly embraced the use of found objects. The artist explains, “These objects of different sizes, shapes, and textures are like tubes of paint. They are another medium to work with.”

Fruit Platter, 1975, was inspired by a wedge of wood spotted beside the service road of the Long Island Expressway. Richard Gachot picked it up, thinking it looked like a piece of watermelon, and painted it red and green. Placing it with other carved and painted fruit on a wooden platter, he created an image of abundance reminiscent of the first generation of American still life artist. Read More

Al Hirschfeld: Illustrator of an Era

Feast for the Eyes: Art Inspired by Food and Dining
Nassau County Museum of Art
Through November 6, 2016

By Debbie Wells, Artful Circle

img_1975Al Hirschfeld (1903 – 2003) was an American illustrator best known for his portraits of movie and television actors, Broadway stars and other celebrities. His drawings mostly consisted of pure line in black ink, into which Hirschfeld dipped not a pen, but a genuine crow’s quill. He also worked in gray washes and later with color. Read More